© 2012 Fourtoes HunterPenrose00

Hunter Penrose Ltd Process Camera

I know, I know. I cant help myself. Its just it was going sooooo cheap. Even with the fuel for collection its one of the cheapest camera deals….. ever!

Let me introduce you to a Hunter Penrose Ltd Process Camera. It is huge. The ground glass measure 18.5 x 16 inches. With very little tinkering this is going to make a great studio wet plate camera. Its surprising what one can find on Feepay nowadays.

I pick it up this week before I pop off to NY. I’ll leave it in the studio for John to play with while I’m away. If he’s feeling adventurous he might like to make a silver bath so we can shoot plates this size… hint hint nudge nudge.

HunterPenrose01

The white masking tape is A4. Gives you an idea of what plate size might be achievable.
HunterPenrose02

I’m assured that when extended the bellows are in excellent condition.
HunterPenrose03

Comes with a plate holder thats adapted for film at the moment but thats apparently just a glass plate to wedge the film against, similar to when we shoot tintypes.
HunterPenrose04

These metal parts inside the rear are for holding the original plates and measure 16×13.5 inches. These can be removed. It even comes with a Ross-London Homocentric f10 lens.
HunterPenrose06

More pics to follow after I’ve picked it up, oh, and told Steph I’ve bought another camera….

Share

2 Comments

  1. Alex
    Posted July 10, 2012 at 2:05 PM | #

    A fantastic camera, and truly monstrous in its dimensions. It will be a 2 man job (at least) to move it around, but given that it will be studio based, hopefully this will not happen all that often :)

    The Hunter Penrose is pretty much the scourge of the Museum world – they appear fairly regularly for disposal, and institutions such as the Media Museum in Bradford, and the National Museum in Scotland have several in their stores.

    They are a bit of a headache due to their sheer size, and sadly many of them go to the great skip in the sky, so very happy indeed to see your saved and planned to be re-used :)

  2. Posted March 20, 2014 at 4:13 PM | #

    46 years ago when I started working I begun by learning how to work with this type of camera and after that as a prepress photographer. In those days a simple task that now takes a couple of minutes took hours to get it right. The shutter time was measured by taking off the lens cap and controlling the exposure with a wristwatch. The lighting was created by a system of arcs with two carbon chain attached to it and lit throughout the measurement, focus and exposure.
    After many years I finally tracked down one of these cameras and now it sits in my advertising agency not for work but for show and tell and to teach our visitors what it was like to photograph in those days

Post a Comment

Your email is never published nor shared. Required fields are marked *

*
*


8 × six =